Montessori Curriculum

The Montessori curriculum is uniquely organized to present concepts and ideas appropriate to the child. Initially, lessons are introduced simply and concretely and are reinvestigated throughout future school years to increasing depth, breadth and complexity. The curriculum is tied together by thematic studies. The curriculum seeks to integrate experiences across traditional subjects and to facilitate the child’s ability to identify his place in the world.


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Practical Life

The Practical Life area is essential for a strong Montessori educational foundation. In this area, the child learns control of movement, concentration span, self-confidence, and a love of learning. These activities are made up of familiar objects that a child naturally sees in everyday life (glass pitchers and plates for eating, tools for woodworking and repair, pruning shears, brooms and mops, sponges, etc.). Learn more . . .

 

Sensorial

The Sensorial materials help children become more keenly aware of small details that are often overlooked. Each activity focuses on one quality such as color, weight, shape, size, texture, sound or smell. Sensorial activities strengthen the senses of perception and discrimination for exploring and noticing small differences in patterns as well as fine motor function development in the hands. Learn more . . .

 
 Making numbers with bead material--unit beads, 10 bars, 100 squares, and 1000 cubes

Mathematics

The Montessori study of mathematics encompasses the use of concrete materials for the recognition of quantities, numerals, and the relationship between the two. These activities are divided into four distinct areas: linear counting, decimal system, operations, and geometry. Children apply their knowledge to real life tasks such as graphing daily temperatures, measurements in cooking, estimating the height of a tree, etc. Learn more . . .

 
 Repeating spelling patterns by composing simple words using moveable alphabet letters

Language

The Language materials encourage development of early-literacy skills through phonemic awareness activities. These materials expand the child's vocabulary and strengthen listening skills. Language activities also include practicing fine motor skills, reading development with word lists, practicing parts of grammar (nouns, verbs, adjectives, etc.), creating sentences, and reading silently. Learn more . . .

 
 Performing an experiment to determine which items will sink and which ones will float

Science

The Montessori Science curriculum encompasses a wide variety of subjects: Earth Science, Biology, Botany, Zoology, and Physics. These materials allow children to look at the world with curiosity and understanding through observation and classification. Children learn to differentiate between theory and fact, and maintain a healthy interest in figuring out how and why things work. Learn more . . .

 
 Preparing to label continents on her watercolor map of the two hemispheres of the Earth

Geography

The study of Physical Geography helps children develop spatial awareness, orientation skills, and a basic knowledge of land- and water-forms. Exercises in Political Geography acquaint them with regions and landmarks of our world. Cultural Geography studies allow children to discover, understand, and celebrate cultural diversity and appreciate similarities and differences in all of humankind. Learn more . . .

 
 Celebrating a birthday by carrying the Earth around the "sun" for each year of life

History

History study in the Montessori classroom helps the child develop a clear sense of time passage which is the foundation of a well-developed historical perspective. Using everyday experiences, the child begins by recognizing the past, present, and future tenses. Various units of time are explored (seasons, months, days of the week, hours, minutes, etc.). Using personal timelines enables the child to see his own passage of time and his place in history. Learn more . . .